From version < 2.2 >
edited by Vincent Massol
on 2010/06/23
To version < 2.3 >
edited by Vincent Massol
on 2010/06/23
< >
Change comment: Added info about the monitor plugin

Summary

Details

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4 4  ** Monitor the Velocity macro caches
5 5  ** Monitor the caches XWiki is using to cache Document data, Users & Groups data and more
6 6  
7 +{{info}}
8 +XWiki also has a [[Monitor Plugin>>platform:AdminGuide.Logging#HActivatingtheXWikimonitoringfeature]] that you can use to monitor execution times. However this plugin is going to be deprecated in the future and replaced by the JMX technology.
9 +{{/info}}
10 +
7 7  = JMX Console =
8 8  
9 9  Since JMX is a standard you can use [[any JMX-compatible monitoring console>>http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1744900/what-is-the-best-or-most-commonly-used-jmx-console-client]] (most application servers provide a web-based JMX console). There's also such a console called [[JConsole>>http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/J2SE/jconsole.html]] and which is bundled by default in the Java Runtime you're using. To start it, simply execute the ##jconsole## executable.

There are 2 solutions you can use to monitor a running XWiki instance:

  • Use a Profiler. This has the advantage of providing advanced information but has the drawback of being resource intensive and thus slowing the XWiki instance. It also requires a special startupscript
  • Starting with XWiki Enterprise 2.4M2 we've now started using the JMX Technology to provide runtime monitoring of XWiki instances. The following features are currently available:
    • Monitor the Velocity macro caches
    • Monitor the caches XWiki is using to cache Document data, Users & Groups data and more

XWiki also has a Monitor Plugin  that you can use to monitor execution times. However this plugin is going to be deprecated in the future and replaced by the JMX technology.

JMX Console

Since JMX is a standard you can use any JMX-compatible monitoring console (most application servers provide a web-based JMX console). There's also such a console called JConsole and which is bundled by default in the Java Runtime you're using. To start it, simply execute the jconsole executable.

Example of JConsole showing the Velocity Cache monitoring:

jconsole1.png

jconsole2.png

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